Growth of online dating industry

Two-thirds of the singles and fling-seekers in America’s online-dating market are older than 34, IBISWorld data show.Pew Research surveys show 45-to-54-year-olds in America are just as likely to date online as 18-to-24 year olds, either because they’re divorced or far from the easier dating scenes of college campuses and first jobs.But finding love on the Web has long been mainstream — 59 percent of Americans said online dating was a good way to meet people in 2013, up from 44 percent in 2005, Pew data show — and some analysts argue more and more adults will find love in the simpler, more visual way, by swiping on Tinder or somewhere else.“It’s easier now to get married right than it has ever been,” said Warren, the e Harmony founder.With the industry expected to grow by another 0 million every year through 2019, analysts say the dating game is increasingly becoming a battle of the ages, with both sides hoping their age-based gambles yield the most profit from those looking for love.It’s not clear that the young and perky are the best market for corporate matchmakers.

Match alone has more than 2 million daters across North America, a third of whom are over the age of 50.Though the firm said subscribers are joining at faster rates and staying longer, analysts last year estimated e Harmony’s revenue growth had slowed to a crawl, and was still half that of the Match Group’s, the mix of Tinder, Match and OKCupid that brought in more than 0 million in the U. Many market-watchers have questioned the basic premise of e Harmony and other sites, which depend on long detailed profiles and dedicated algorithms.Economist Dan Ariely and other researchers have argued that online dating profiles rest on a fatal flaw: They show “searchable” attributes, like job or religion, while ignoring the key details of a dater’s personality: sense of humor, conversation style, etc.“The young ‘uns can have it.” The company defended the pricing structure as aimed at accommodating younger “budget-constrained” daters, but analysts have questioned just how many singles will pay up to find an online match.In a February note to clients, Morgan Stanley analysts said the honeymoon period for Tinder’s “casual dating” wouldn’t last for long.

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